Material Handling Network

Sign Up for Network's eNewsletter & Digital Edition

*  Your Email Address:  

subscribe

Product / Dealer / Manufacturer Search

Loading MHN Dealer Search
Browse Dealers by Category
eNet Classifieds Industry Chatter Material Handling Network Featured Products
View Printer Friendly

OSHA focuses on Combustible Dust in Alabama

Friday, August 28, 2009

Over the last 16 months, compliance officers from the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have made 26 visits to Alabama companies where employees may be exposed to potential combustible dust hazards.

The result has been 132 citations for workplace safety and health violations, with 81 percent categorized as willful, serious, repeat or failure to abate.

The visits are part of the agency's ongoing National Emphasis Program to reduce employees' exposure to combustible dust hazards. Nationally, 3,662 violations have been identified during 813 inspections. Housekeeping, hazard communication, personal protective equipment, electrical and general duty clause violations are cited most frequently as a result of these inspections.

"Any company that has combustible dust, or thinks that it may have combustible dust, needs to intensify housekeeping, review hot work processes, evaluate electrical equipment for possible Class II locations, prohibit smoking or flames in dust laden areas, ensure that relief venting on dust collection systems releases the dust to a safe location, and develop and/or review an emergency action plan," said OSHA Regional Administrator Cindy Coe.

Dust fires and explosions can pose significant dangers in the workplace and can occur when five different factors are present. The five factors are oxygen, an ignition source (heat, an electrical spark or a spark from metal machinery), fuel (dust), dispersion of the dust and confinement of the dust. These five factors are referred to as the "Dust Explosion Pentagon." If any one of these factors is removed or is missing, an explosion cannot occur.

Industries affected by the emphasis program include: agriculture, chemical, textile, forest products, furniture products, wastewater treatment, metal processing, paper processing, pharmaceutical and metal, paper and plastic recycling.

OSHA develops National Emphasis Programs to focus on major health and safety hazards that are recognized as nationally significant. These programs provide guidance to the OSHA field offices for planning and conducting inspections consistently across the nation. Additional information regarding this particular initiative is available from the OSHA regional office located at 61 Forsyth St. S.W., Atlanta, GA 30303; telephone 404/562-2300.

Robert Zuiderveld
cell: 973/997-5357
e-mail: robert.zuiderveld@pyroban.com
WWW.PYROBAN.US

View all Industry News

Home  |  Subscribe Now  |  Industry News  |  Business Profiles  |  Product Previews  |  Featured Columns
Advertising  |  Media Planner  |  Current Digital Magazine  |  2014 Digital Directory  |  Contact Us

Privacy Policy  |  Site Map

Web Design and Web Development by the OIC Group

Copyright 2014 © Material Handling Network • 217 Loren Street, Washington, IL 61571
Tel: 309-699-4431 • Toll Free: 800-447-6901 • Fax: 309-698-0801
A WoodwardBizMedia Publication